Warning to Visitors

Some of the information below may be out of date as a result of changing timetables and services. Please double check the accuracy of all information before travelling.

The booking forms should be up to date however, so if tickets for a particular service are available, then the service should be operational.

Tren a las Nubes

Rail

Overview

Countries Served:

The Tren a las Nubes (Tren de las Nubes), which translates to Train to/of the Clouds is an Argentinian train service which connects the country with the Chilean border. 

During operation, the service crosses 29 bridges, travels through 21 tunnels, over 13 viaducts, goes around 2 spirals and 2 zigzags. 

Accommodation

There is only one class of accommodation on-board the service. All seats are comfortable, although the on-board entertainment can limit the opportunities for passengers to doze off! 

Passengers are advised to sit on the left hand side of the train when they board in Salta. At the summit, the train reverses, so you will get the same view on both the outbound and return journeys, but the left hand side is generally the better view.

Luggage & Facilities

Small luggage racks are available above the seats, but space is otherwise limited, so try not to bring too much with you.

Food & Drink

The operator asks passengers not to bring food or dink on-board, but most passengers (particularly the Argentinians) tend to bring picnics with them. Various reports suggest that the food available on-board is not particularly good. Neverthless, for most passengers it is included within the ticket price. Breakast consists of coffee and sweet croissants. Lunch is a hot meal, generally rice and meat, with a pudding. The on-board bar sells a range of drinks, including Mate de Coca, said to help altitude sickness. A restaurant carriage also provides more substantial meal choices, but these are expensive (75 Argentinian Pesos)

Entertainment

Tour guides are provided on the service, providing information primarily in Argentinain and English, although German printed guides are also available. 

Tips, Questions & Comments